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Oevering 2011

Created By: Denim Wilson

http://www.csithehague.com/en/038/Press_release:_CSI_The_Hague_brings_innovation_to_forensic_investigation.html

CSI The Hague brings innovation to forensic investigation

High-tech businesses are working together in a consortium based in The Hague

You can only examine a crime scene once. If you miss any evidence, it disappears forever. But if you could keep the crime scene intact by saving it in digital form, this would offer fantastic opportunities for forensic detective work. It would mean that the crime scene could still be examined even after it has been released. That's why the Netherlands Forensic Institute, high-tech businesses and state-of-the-art knowledge institutes are working together to digitize the crime scene, in the CSI The Hague project. The city council of The Hague and the Ministry of Economic Affairs are sponsoring the project. Together with the consortium, they are spending a total of nearly 5 million euro. 

A unique collaboration

Leading Dutch knowledge institutes and high-tech businesses are investing their energies in the CSI The Hague project with the aim of improving forensic science. The consortium partners comprise the Netherlands Forensic Institute, Philips, TNO, the Delft University of Technology, the Amsterdam Medical Centre, Capgemini, E-Semble, Forensic Technical Solutions, Thales, Noldus Information Technology, Chess, Eagle Vision, the Technology Investment Group and The Hague University of applied sciences. The project is unique within the international forensic world, and is attracting a lot of attention from abroad.  

An innovative new forensic investigation solution

[1]  The world of forensic investigation is on the brink of a revolution. By using technologies that were originally developed for medical science or defence, it will soon be possible to keep evidence from a crime scene intact, quickly, easily and digitally.  

The digital information will then be made available in a virtual location. This will enable researchers to virtually revisit the crime scene at any given moment and to virtually feel, smell, hear and see which evidence has been left behind. 'Freezing' the crime scene in this way offers a tremendous range of opportunities for testing hypotheses while the investigation is underway. In addition, it can at a later stage - for example in court - provide an insight into the circumstances under which a particular event took place. 


Improved training opportunities

[2]  Securing evidence on a crime scene requires sound research techniques and protocols. But it's hard to train people in these techniques. Using the techniques that are being developed within CSI The Hague, professionals can in the future be trained in a virtual environment, based on realistic cases. This will make it possible to develop methods and best practices that can be used to train people, with the help of the latest 'serious gaming' technologies. By replaying the events at the crime scene, it will also soon be possible to observe human behaviour and analyse this scientifically with the help of cameras and sensors. This will enable us to further improve our ability to secure evidence.
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Villareal 2011

Created By: Denim Wilson

http://www.theiai.org/certifications/crime_scene/requirements.php


[1] REQUIREMENTS FOR IAI CRIME SCENE CERTIFICATION

  1. General Qualifications

    An applicant for certification must be of good moral character, high integrity, and good repute and must possess high ethical professional standing.

  2. Certification

    Applicants may apply for any certification where the applicant meets the requirements as listed below. It should be noted that for initial certification, hours will be used to calculate the figures, and credits used to calculate the recertification figures.

    1. Certified Crime Scene Investigator

      1. Must have a minimum of one (1) year in crime scene related activities.

      2. Must have completed a minimum of 48 hours of Crime Scene Certification Board approved instruction in crime scene related courses within the last five (5) years.
    2. Certified Crime Scene Analyst
      1. Must have a minimum of three (3) years in crime scene related activities.

      2. Must have completed a minimum of 96 hours of Crime Scene Certification Board approved instruction in crime scene related courses within the last five (5) years.

    3. Certified Crime Scene Reconstructionist

    4. Certified Senior Crime Scene Analyst

      1. Must have a minimum of six (6) years in crime scene related activities.

      2. Must have completed a minimum of 144 hours of Crime Scene Certification Board approved instruction in crime scene related courses within the last five (5) years. AND one of the following:

        1. Must have authored or coauthored an article on some phase of crime scene investigation published in a professional journal OR;

        2. Made a presentation on some phase of crime scene investigation to a professional organization, OR;

        3. Be an active instructor in some phase of crime scene investigation who is currently teaching at least once a year, OR;

        4. Submit a court transcript from an actual case in which the applicant gave testimony on some phase of crime scene investigation.

  3. Initial In-house Training:

    Upon approval by the Crime Scene Certification Board, an agency's structured training program hours may be reciprocated for portions of or for the amount of required hours of instruction for the appropriate crime scene certification.

  4. Continuing Education/Professional Development Hours:

    The topics that qualify in the area of crime scene approved training are as listed below. The Crime Scene Certification Board, on request, will consider other topics:

    Alternate Light Source Training
    Arson Investigations
    Blood Pattern Analysis
    Clandestine Lab Training
    Collection & Preservation of Evidence
    Courtroom Testimony
    Crime Scene Documentation
    Crime Scene Investigations
    Crime Scene Photography
    Crime Scene Reconstruction
    Death Investigations
    Evidence Photography
      Footwear and Tire Tread
    Forensic Anthropology
    Forensic Archeology
    Forensic Odontology
    Latent Print Detection/Comparison
    Post Blast Investigations
    Report Writing
    Rules of Evidence
    Sex Crime Investigations
    Traffic Accident Investigations
    Underwater/Subsurface search and recovery

    Please note: Certification exam book review courses do not count towards the number of required hours for the various crime scene certification programs.

  5. Testing

    In addition to the listed requirements for each level the applicant must successfully pass a written test with a minimum score of 75%. All written tests are graded and recorded on a pass/fail basis only. (Numerical scores are not provided)

    1. The tests will be taken from publications selected by the Crime Scene Certification Board. The titles will be published and the Board may not change them for a minimum of three (3) years.

    2. These texts supersede any practice or agency directives for certification testing purposes.

    3. Questions and time

      1. CCSI: 200 questions with a time limit of 3 hours

      2. CCSA: 300 questions with a time limit of 4 hours

      3. CSCSA: 400 questions with a time limit of 5 hours

    4. All crime scene certification tests are proctored.

    5. Throughout the comprehensive written testing process you may not have/use any supporting/reference material/textbooks or have internet access.
  1. TEST MATERIAL PUBLICATIONS (Updated April 12, 2011)

    1. Certified Crime Scene Investigator (CCSI)
      • Crime Scene Photography, Edition II, by Edward Robinson, 2010, Elsevier Science & Technology Books (All Chapters EXCEPT 1, 8 and 12)
      • Practical Crime Scene Processing and Investigation by Ross M. Gardner, 2005, CRC Press
    2. Certified Crime Scene Analyst (CCSA)
      • Crime Scene Photography, Edition II, by Edward Robinson, 2010, Elsevier Science & Technology Books (All Chapters EXCEPT 1, 8 and 12)
      • Practical Crime Scene Processing and Investigation by Ross M. Gardner, 2005, CRC Press
      • Crime Scene Investigation by Fish, Miller and Braswell. Due to the unavailability of Edition One of "Crime Scene Investigation", by Fish-Miller-Braswell, the comprehensive portion of the CCSA test using this book has been modified so that you may study either Edition One or Two.

        Edition Two is published by Elsevier with a date of 2010 and can be found on most book sites.
    3. Certified Senior Crime Scene Analyst (CSCSA)
      • Crime Scene Photography, Edition II, by Edward Robinson, 2010, Elsevier Science & Technology Books (All Chapters EXCEPT 1, 8 and 12)
      • Practical Crime Scene Processing and Investigation by Ross M. Gardner, 2005, CRC Press
      • Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science (9th Edition) by Richard Saferstein, 2007, Prentice Hall
  2. APPLICATION PROCEDURES

    1. Application forms may be obtained from:

      International Association for Identification
      2131 Hollywood Blvd., Suite 403
      Hollywood, FL 33020

    2. All applicants for certification must submit two (2) letters of endorsement. If the applicant is employed by a public law enforcement agency, one letter shall be from a superior within the applicant’s department or agency and one shall be from an associate in the field of crime scene investigations and who is a member of either a state or regional division and/or the parent body.

    3. The completed application, with supporting documentation to include two (2) recent photographs, one additional copy of all submitted paperwork application, and the application fee of $150.00 (Not Refundable) shall be forwarded to the:

      International Association for Identification 
      Crime Scene Certification Board 
      2131 Hollywood Blvd., Suite 403
      Hollywood, FL 33020

    4. Crime Scene Certification shall be issued for a period of five (5) years.

    5. Applicant procedures for certification are subject to revision by the Crime Scene Certification Board (CSCB). The latest official version is always available from the CSCB Secretary.

  3. GENERAL PROVISIONS CONCERNING CERTIFICATION

    1. The right to deny certification is reserved.

      Applicants who are denied certification by the CSCB may appeal such action in writing within sixty (60) days after the issue date of such notification.

    2. Certificates granted and issued may be suspended or revoked by the CSCB for any of the following reasons:

      1. A conviction of an applicant for certification, or holder of a certificate, by a court of competent jurisdiction of a felony or any crime involving moral turpitude.

      2. A misstatement, misrepresentation, concealment, or omission of a material fact or facts in an application or any other communication related to certification.

      3. Issuance of a certificate contrary to or in violation of any of the laws, standards, rules or regulations of the IAI, or determination that the person certified was not in fact eligible to receive such certificate at the time of issuance.

      4. Any violation of the IAI Code of Ethics.

    3. Action to suspend or revoke may only be taken after at least thirty (30) days advance notice of the charges or reasons for such action has been given to the individual concerned and an opportunity for such person to be heard has been provided by the CSCB.

    4. Persons holding a valid certificate of qualifications issued by the CSCB are entitled to use the appropriate designations in conformance with the standards of the International Association for Identification.

    5. Certificates issued by the International Association for Identification are non-transferable. They remain the property of the IAI, but every person to whom a certificate has been issued shall be entitled to its continued possession, unless and until such certificate is revoked.

    6. Membership in the IAI or any of its state or regional divisions is not mandatory for certification, however, the candidate for certification must agree to abide by the provisions of the certification program as written and passed by the IAI.
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Anonymous 2011E

Created By: Denim Wilson

http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/becomeone.html


Step #1: Learn about the job.

[1] What does a Crime Scene Investigator do? What skills, knowledge and abilities are required? What education and experience is needed to qualify for the job?

The answers depend on the exact job you apply for and the agency that offers the job. Read the job summaries of the job openings listed on the Employment page. This will give you an idea of the variety of responsibilities the employee will have as well as the minimum requirements to apply for the job.

Also, read over the material on the Crime-Scene-Investigator.net (this www site). There is a variety of information that will help you understand the job of a Crime Scene Investigator. One article, Duty Description for the Crime Scene Investigator, by Mike Byrd of the Miami-Dade Police Department Crime Scene Investigations Unit, gives a good description of what a Crime Scene Investigator does on the job.

One of the best things you can do is to contact agencies in the geographical area you wish to work and find out what their Crime Scene Investigators do on the job, what their minimum requirements for applying are, and how often the have job openings.

Are there Crime Scene Technician jobs available?

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, a "forensic science technician" is a person employed to "collect, identify, classify, and analyze physical evidence related to criminal investigations" (this would include crime scene technicians who work in the field and technicians who work in the crime laboratory). The Bureau's Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, states: "Jobs for forensic science technicians are expected to increase by 20 percent, which is much faster than average. Employment growth in State and local government should be driven by the increasing application of forensic science techniques, such as DNA analysis, to examine, solve, and prevent crime." The report also points out: "In addition to job openings created by growth, many openings should arise from the need to replace technicians who retire or leave the labor force for other reasons."(Read the Occupational Outlook Handbook report)

In May 2009 the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the mean hourly wage was $26.47 and the mean annual wage was $55,070 (annual wages at the 10 percentile were $32,420 and the 90 percentile were $84,260) for forensic science technicians. (Read the Bureau of Labor Statistics report)

Some recent job openings posted on this website have the following pay scales listed:

  • [2]Crime Scene Technician: $51,204 — $63,444
  • Identification Technician: $44,740 — $73,965
  • Latent Print Technician: $38,822 — $64,704
  • Forensic Scientist Trainee: $46,815 — $78,319
  • Crime Scene Section Supervisor: $65,813 — $98,197
  • Criminalist: $65,645 — $102,190

Step #2: Prepare for the job.

[3]Some positions require you have a 4 year degree in science while others only require a GED or High School graduation. Generally, if you want to work in a crime laboratory as a Criminalist you will need at least a 4 year degree in science (such as Biology or Chemistry). If you want to be a Crime Scene Technician you usually need less formal education. Some agencies require you be a sworn police officer before becoming a Crime Scene Investigator--most do not.

If the position you want requires formal training then check your local colleges and universities. Many community colleges have Criminal Justice classes that include crime scene investigations. Search for a campus based college or university program here: Campus Based CSI and Forensic Programs

Can I get training online to become a Crime Scene Technician?

You can also make yourself more marketable by earning a certificate or degree in Crime Scene Investigations or Forensic Science online from a college with a respected program. Many online programs can be completed in less time than traditional campus based programs. Examples of respected online programs include (click on the links to receive free, no obligation, information):

Other related areas of study include (click on the topic to see lists of online colleges and universities offering these programs):

Complete listings of Colleges and Universities offering programs in CSI and Forensics:

Regardless of what the education and experience are for the job you are seeking, there are some things you can do to prepare for the job and the interview. Again, reading over the material on this www site will give you some information. But if you really want to be prepared, you must do more. As a person who interviews candidates for law enforcement jobs I can tell you that agencies are inclined to give jobs to those who have a clear understanding of the job they are applying for, and have done something to prepare themselves for the job.

One way to gain knowledge and be able to show you have prepared yourself is to read the right books. I strongly recommend you read the following books before interviewing for the job (and be sure you tell those interviewing you that you have read these books).

First, a book that tells about the science of crime scene investigation:

cover Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, Seventh Edition by Barry A.J. Fisher (September 25, 2003) ($73.05)
Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, Seventh Edition examines concepts, field-tested techniques and procedures, and technical information concerning crime scene investigation. This comprehensive text has been widely adopted by police academies, community colleges, and universities. Three professional organizations-the International Association for Identification, the American Board of Criminalistics, and the Forensic Science Society-recommend this book as a text to prepare for their certification examinations.

As you read through the job announcements, you will see that two areas are frequently mentioned. They are photography and fingerprints. Some even require photographic skills to apply. If you have little or no photographic skill, find a book on basic photography, get a camera, and learn photography. You should consider a basic photography class at a community college. Then you should learn about crime scene and evidence photography. For a book on crime scene and evidence photography you should read the book in use by thousands of Crime Scene Investigators:

cover Crime Scene & Evidence Photographer's Guide, 2nd Edition by Steven Staggs (2005) ($29.95)
The Crime Scene and Evidence Photographer's Guide is designed to be a field reference for those responsible for photography at the crime scene. It may be used by law enforcement officers, investigators, and crime scene technicians. It contains instructions for photographing a variety of crimes scenes and various types of evidence. It is a valuable reference tool when combined with training and experience. The Crime Scene and Evidence Photographer's Guide is also a helpful resource for students and others interested in entering into the field of crime scene investigation. Designed to be carried in an evidence kit or camera bag, this publication contains step-by-step instructions for photographing crime scenes and evidence. It includes 42 example photographs, eight diagrams, and three tables. Order this title directly from the publisher and receive a 10% discount.

For a good foundation on comparing fingerprints, you should read (and work through the quizzes in the book):

cover Introduction to Fingerprint Comparison by Gary W. Jones (October 16, 2000) ($29.95)
Introduction to Fingerprint Comparison was written by retired FBI Supervisory Fingerprint Specialist Gary W. Jones. This book is a valuable text in learning the basic skills in fingerprint comparison. Examples and quizzes give the reader a solid foundation on which to build comparison skills. Order this title directly from the publisher and receive a 10% discount.


Step #3: Apply for the job.

Have a good resume. Even if the agency does not require a resume, attach one to the application. It can make the difference in getting an interview and even the job.

Check for job openings on the employment page. To be notified of job openings as they are posted, follow us on Twitter. To sign up for the Crime Scene Investigator Newsletter and receive monthly notifications, go to the subscribe to the newsletter page.



Step #4: Testing and interview.

Many agencies will require you to pass a written examination followed by an interview.

Be sure you do your homework before you have your interview. Learn about the agency and the community it serves. A favorite question asked in interviews is "What do you know about our department and what do you know about our community?" Be prepared to answer the typical questions.

Two articles on this website give tips on preparing for an interview:


Have more questions?

Have any more questions about becoming a Crime Scene Investigator, or about crime Scene investigations? Ask your questions on the Crime Scene Investigator Forum.

Good Luck!

Crime scene investigations is an interesting and worthwhile career. We wish you the best in your endeavors.

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Anonymous 2011D

Created By: Denim Wilson

http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/csi-campusbasedschools.html#AL


Alabama

NOTE: You may want to request information from several colleges and universities listed below. You can then compare the programs and costs before making a final selection.

Alaska

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Arizona

NOTE: You may want to request information from several colleges and universities listed below. You can then compare the programs and costs before making a final selection.

Arkansas

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California

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Colorado

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Connecticut

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Delaware

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District of Columbia

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Florida

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Georgia

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Hawaii

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Idaho

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Illinois

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Indiana

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Iowa

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Kansas

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Kentucky

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Louisiana

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Maine

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Maryland

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Massachusetts

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Michigan

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Minnesota

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Mississippi

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Missouri

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Montana

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Nebraska

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Nevada

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Can't find the right campus based program in your state? Consider an online program:
  •     Crime Scene Investigation, Forensic Science, Criminal Investigations,
    Computer Forensics, Forensic Psychology, Forensic Nursing, and Criminal Justice
     online programs

    Criminal Justice Programs (Many Criminal Justice Programs offer courses in CSI and Forensics)

  •  Criminal Justice, Kaplan College, Las Vegas
  •  Criminal Justice, Everest College, Henderson
  •    Criminal Justice, University of Phoenix, Las Vegas
  •    Criminal Justice, University of Phoenix, Reno
  •  Bachelor of Technical Management - Criminal Justice, DeVry University, Henderson
  •  Certified Fraud Examiner, Keller Graduate School of Management, Henderson

    New Hampshire

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    New Jersey

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    New Mexico

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    New York

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    North Carolina

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    North Dakota

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    Ohio

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    Oklahoma

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    Oregon

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    Pennsylvania

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    Rhode Island

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    South Carolina

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    South Dakota

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    Tennessee

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    Texas

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    Utah

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    Vermont

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    Virginia

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    Washington

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    West Virginia

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    Wisconsin

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    Wyoming

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    Palmer 2011

    Created By: Denim Wilson

    http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/useofballisticmarkerforidofsuspect.hthttp://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/useofballisticmarkerforidofsuspect.html#ml



    The Use of Ballistic Markers and Other Equipment for Identification of a Suspect at the Scene of the Crime

    MC Enrique Urrutia Palmer
    Forensic Criminologist
    Research Unit
    Mexico

    A few months ago a couple was at a place near the beach having sex when they were surprised by a thief with a knife. The thief began looting their belongings such as cellular phones, wallets, and jewelry.

    After this, the attacker threatened the couple and the man was restrained. He forced the lady into having sex with him, but the assailant did not ejaculate. The attacker fled the scene and dropped all the belongings of the couple in several areas near the crime scene. It is worth mentioning that on the night of the events, the night rain removed any impression that may have been used as the identification of the perpetrator.

    After the aggressor fled, the couple ran to the nearest road and found a highway patrol. The highway patrol started the search for the suspect. A subject with the same characteristics of the suspect, 20 years old according to the statements of victims, was arrested in the vicinity of the attack.

    Among the physical evidence found at the scene, little could be collected as the rain that night completely deleted all fingerprints and shoe impressions at the scene and the objects found in it. The chemical analysis of the rape victim found semen but it was the semen of the partner with whom sex was consensual. The only thing that the prosecution had was the testimony of the victims indicated that the suspect was the person who had attacked that night.

    To corroborate the above it was necessary to turn the testimony into physical, tangible evidence that could or could not illustrate his credibility at the trial. That is why I was named by the court to clarify doubts about the identification of the suspect. It was necessary to analyze and observe the crime scene in the daylight. On a hill was an area with a cement floor, a destroyed wooden roof, and a concrete perimeter surrounded by tall grass. At the bottom of the hill was the beach.

    For the development of this technique was necessary to have the following equipment:

    • [1] Sony Digital Camera DSC 717, with 16 X zoom with accommodations.
    • Sony Macro lens
    • Sony flash
    • Digital Odometer brand indicators Sirchie
    • Signs
    • irframview software program.
    • eagle eye Monopods
    • Program software for Autocad 2005 drawings
    • Tape measure
    • Reflectors Lighting
    • Digital Video Camera Tripod Canon s3is
    • Positioning
    • Balistic laser for determination of trajectory
    • Night Vision Viewer

    Phase 1

    [2] First the signs are placed in the points or the sites mentioned by the participants to determine the position of each of these. Lighting tests were performed to cover all areas and ensure certain areas remain unlit.

    This was based on the testimony given the day the incident occurred in the same position and in the same field of view.

    Phase 2

    Preliminary tests were performed to calibrate devices that were used to photograph the ballistic laser procedure to have the best perspective and accurate data concerning the recreation of the events. Two people helped to mark the same positions at the points already mentioned above. To better view the viewing angle of the witnesses, the ballistic laser angle was used to obscure the front section of the site using only the light from the street lighting as a reference of the projection of shadows.

    Phase 3

    Then the depth and breadth of visual field was analyzed by placing the equipment already mentioned using the following method:

    The lighting was positioned at the height of the observer's (victim's) visual field in all different points of view which are:

    • Entry point to the accused
    • Point of view of the victim to the entry point (on the plateau
    • Point of view of medium-victim approach
    • Point of view of the victim when one of the victims feinting.
    • Point of view of the victim (witness) when performing the alleged violation
    • The point of view of vanishing point by the agents of the state police

    2. [3]In each of these points of view the following sources of lighting were subsequently placed:

    • Normal light
    • Night Vision
    • Laser Marking the point of reference
    • Natural Vision

    Conclusion of Experimental Phase:

    "Identification of the suspect is not feasible ACCORDING TO THE POSITION OF VICTIMS AND CONDITIONS OF SITE LIGHTING"

    Criminalistics Analysis of Physical Evidence

    After reading every one of the records and having reproduced the experimental phase for each and every one of the points found in this opinion, the opening statement of the victim was preliminarily analyzed and drawn upon to form relevant criminological comments:

    EVIDENCE
    AS THE DECLARATIONS
    AS EXPERIMENTAL PHASE
    Field of vision of the supposed victim Positive identification of the supposed person in charge 1 Is not possible a positive identification of the supposed person in charge 1
    Field of vision of supposed victim (witness) Positive identification of the supposed person in charge 1 A positive identification of the supposed person in charge is not possible 1
    Field of vision of apprehending agents Positive identification of the supposed person in charge 1 A positive identification of the supposed person in charge is not possible 1
    Lighting of the point of revenue to the scene of the crime Positive Is not possible for the conditions of natural lighting of the scene
    Lighting of the point of escape of the supposed person in charge of the scene of the crime Positive Is not possible for the conditions of natural lighting of the scene

    Once the experts concluded to study each and every one of the signs related to this opinion and then received the results of their study, they proceed to draw conclusions based on a deductive-inductive process, without forgetting that we rely to initiate the study of such firms in different technology and analytical methodology to divide the problem and reasonable best. In addition, we relied on the analog method - used comparatively to identify likeness or resemblance, and infer some signs of paragraphs related to the fact.

    By virtue of meeting all the above requirements and other scientists that have been recommended in literature, we were in a position to decide or conclude an expert opinion on the specific case study. To describe a more detailed and accurate study of the crime scene, the findings were divided into three types: a) general conclusions, b) specific conclusions and c) specific conclusions.

    a) General Conclusions

    • When the scene was analyzed by the Attorney General, it was noted that the scene was so primitive.
    • Visual inspection tracking physical evidence at the scene (impressions of shoe prints, hair, body fluids) was not found compliant, leaving no physical evidence to support the statements of the victim.

    b) Private Conclusions

    • On the other hand, results in specific areas of the Crime Lab Expert Services Department of the Attorney General of the State regarding identification of associative evidence makes us conclude the following:
    • Lighting conditions and access to the scene is not possible to make a positive identification of the suspect since it was observed in the experimental stage that lighting conditions are almost zero from the point of view of participants.

    c) Finally, considering specific evidence and reconstructive identifiers of the event, held near and distant from the crime scene, and lab results all greatly added specific deductions. The study conclusions are as follows:

    THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE SUPPOSED PERSON IN CHARGE IS NOT FEASIBLE DUE TO THE FACT THAT THE LIGHTING CONDITIONS OF THE SCENE ARE PRACTICALLY NIL.

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    Baldwin 2011C

    Created By: Denim Wilson
    http://www.feinc.net/equipmt.htm

    http://www.feinc.net/equipmt.htm#
    [1] FINGERPRINT EQUIPMENT:
    • Brushes:
      • Fiberglass (3) 
      • Camel Hair (2)
      • Magnetic Wand
      • Wide Magnetic Wand
    • Powders: 
      • Black (regular and magna) 
      • Silver (regular and magna) 
      • Redwop Lift 
    • Tape:(must be compatible to powder and cards)
      • 2" Wide 
      • 4" Wide
      • Rubber Tape
    • Lift Cards:(must be compatible to powder and tape) 
      • Black
      • White 
      • Regular size and 8" by 12" in both colors 
    • Magnifying Glass
    [2] CASTING EQUIPMENT:
    • Plaster of Paris (5 lbs)
    • Dental Powder (2 gallons) 
    • Silicone casting material
    • Dupli-cast 
    • Mikrosil Rubber 
    • Mixing Bowl (2 sizes)
    • Rubber Spatula
    • Reenforcement mesh 
    • Plastic Bags
    • Metal Retaining Ring
    • Plastic Weigh Boats
    • Wooden Tongue Depressors 
    • Modeling Clay (for dam) 
    • Identification Tags with string 
    • Snow wax (for impressions in snow)
    [3] PHOTOGRAHIC EQUIPMENT:
    • Cameras:
      • 35mm with adjustable controls
      • 2 1/4 with adjustable controls or larger format 
      • Extra batteries for cameras
    • Lens: 
      • Normal 
      • Wide angle (28mm maximum) 
      • Macro (capabale of 1:1 ratio)
      • Telephoto
    • Film: 
      • Color 
      • Black and White 
      • Adequate supply for both formats 
    • Flash:
      • Compatible strobes for cameras
      • Batteries 
      • PC cord (6 - 10 ft) 
    • Tripod: 
      • Adjustable head and legs
    • Measuring Devices:
      • Disposable rulers 
    • Filters: 
      • 80b filter
      • Orange filter 
      • Polarizing 
    • Miscellaneous
      • Lens brush and lens tissue 
      • Photo flood light
      • Camera carrying cases
      • Shutter release cable
    [4] EVIDENCE PACKAGING SUPPLIES:
    • Paper Bags:
      • Assorted sizes
      • Paper: 
        • For pharmacy folds
    • Metal cans:
      • Arson debris 
      • Hands 
    • Glass Vials 
    • Evidence Tape 
    • Marking Pen 
    • Stapler 
    • Pill boxes (folding)
    [5] BLOOD COLLECTION SUPPLIES:
    • Sterilized Cloth Squares
    • Sterilized Thread 
    • Glass Microscope plates 
    • Distilled Water 
    • Scalpel 
    • Disposable Scalpel Blades 
    • Tweezers 
    • Small Scissors
    [6] DECEASED PRINT KIT:
    • 2" Roller 
    • 4" Roller 
    • Black ink 
    • Porelon pad 
    • Finger strips 
    • Plain paper 
    • Ink remover 
    • Tissue builder
    [7] HAND TOOLS:
    • Claw Hammer
    • Hack Saw 
    • Assorted Screwdrivers 
    • Assorted Pliers 
    • Pipe Wrench 
    • Prybar 
    • Visegrips 
    • Wire Cutters 
    • Bolt Cutters 
    • Socket Set (metric and standard) 
    • Wood Chisels 
    • Hand Axe
    • Shovels 
    • Sifters 
    • Slim Jim 
    • Automoble Door Handle Remover 
    • Measuring Devices: 
      • 26ft Steel Tape 
      • 100ft Tape 
    • Pocket Knife
    [8] BIOHAZARD KIT
    • Disposable latex gloves
    • Disposable footwear protectors (booties)
    • Disposable face mask/shield
    • Disposable gown/apron
    • Disposable Bio-Hazardous waste bag (trash)
    [9] MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT:
    • Flashlight and spare batteries 
    • Writing paper and report forms 
    • Graph paper 
    • Clipboard 
    • Writing and marking pens 
    • Metal scribe 
    • Chalk and crayons 
    • Cellophane tape and dispenser 
    • Clear book binding tape 
    • Extra evidence tape
    • Extra staples and stapler 
    • Scissors
    • Scalpels and replacement blades 
    • Large and small forceps 
    • Compass 
    • Large Magnet 
    • 100ft Nylon rope 
    • 100ft Electrical Cord 
    • Metal detector 
    • Ultra-violet light: Low and high wavelength 
    • Protective eyewear 
    • Static lifter 
    • Portable Laser or Alternate Light Source (Basic?)
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