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Natalie Pineda's Paper

Created By: Jessica De anda
A1: Parkinson's Disease
Q2: Report: (Required*) 
A2: Imagine, (maybe you should take out the comma and add it before "never being able to stop") always shaking. Never being able to stop. Think about not being able to perform the easiest tasks ever. Like writing your name or holding a pencil, or even hugging someone you love without any interference. Well even though some are lucky to not have to worry people suffering from Parkinson's disease face this struggle everyday n]and still seem to cope with it.
Parkinsons disease is a very widely known disease. This disease is known to take over one's mind and take over their body. PD, parkinson's disease for short, can ruin someones life in just a matter of a time. The hook is good :)

Parkinson Disease appears in both men and women. (Stern 2013, 1) Even though this may be true it occurs more in men then women about 50%more. (Stern2013, 2) On average PD occurs at around the age 60 or so. (Stern 2013, 3)
If someone is diagnosed early it would be somewhere around the age 40.( Stern 2013, 4) Its is known that almost 500,000 people in the United States have Parkinson's Disease. (Stern 2013, 8) Also around 50,000 people are diagnosed in one year. (Stern 2013,5) People who have Parkinsons have around the same life expectancy as others who don't. (Stern 2013, 6) The only difference is all of their struggles become complications that are life threatening.(Stern 2013, 6Their shaking and tremors may causes them to fall or choke. (Stern 2013, 6

Parkinsons Disease goes through different stages each becoming more intense. PD will slowly progress over 20 years.(McCoy2013, 1) However, this number varies for different people suffering from Parkinson's. As this disease progresses, it goes through different stages. The first stage will only affect one side of the body. McCoy2013, 2) This causing (use "causes' instead of "causing") everyday tasks to become difficult, but are able to be handled. (MD 2005, 1) This stage also will cause slight and minor tremors and shaking. (MD 2005,2)  Even though these symptoms don't seem to severe they do take a toll on ones everyday life. And this symptoms only get worse as the PD progresses. 

In the second stage the disease starts affecting both sides of the brain. However balance is still intact. (McCoy 2013, 3) Even thought this may be true there is also declines in posture.(Jason 2010, 2) The persons isn't neccesarily disable but some tasks are hard to perform. (Jason D 2010, 1) In this stage doctors tend to prescribe medication to the patient. (Jason D 2010, 3) Also along with the medication, the patient will reccieve (receive) dopamine agonist. ( Jason D 2010, 4) This will block nerve impulses. (Jason D 2010, 4) Even going through this a patients symptoms will continue to get worse.

Stage 3 of this disease is when all the previous symptoms will worsen. The symptoms become mild to moderate. (McCoy 2013, 4) Their balance still remains impaired.(McCoy 2013, 4) This person can still however perform simple tasks by themselves. (McCoy 2013, 4) One's motions become slowed down and have a hard time walking. (Jason D 2010, 5) Another great risk at this stage is falling. ( Jason D 2010, 6) Due to the unbalance of the person this risk is increased. At this time much more powerful medications are prescribed to the patient. (Jason D 2010, 6)

Once onto (I think "in" might sound better than "onto" but thats not important :)) stage 4 everything becomes very much difficult for the person suffering from Parkinsons Disease.This stage is reffered (referred) to as "Advanced Parkinsons disease". (Jason D 2010, 7) People with stage 4 Parkinson's Disease are severely disabled. (McCoy 2013, 5) They are unable to complete their very simple day-to-day tasks as usual. (Jason D 2010, 6) This person would be unable to live by themselves. (Jason D 2010, 11) People at this stage are also recommended to be in a wheelchair (Jason D 2010,12) At this stage surgery is an option to slow down the symptoms.  (Jason D 2010, 13) However this option is always open to everyone. The person who is (are) interested in this surgery would have to be healthy and young, which isn't in always in most cases (Jason D 2010, 14)

The most advanced and severe stage is stage 5. (Jason D 2010, 16) Someone at this stage is not able to take care of themselves anymore. (Jason D 2010, 17) Stage 5 sufferers need around the clock care to keep well. (Jason D 2010, 18)something known as Cachexia occurs in this stage and this means that  their (there) is unwanted weight and muscle lost. (Jason D 2010, 19) At this stage someone suffering form Parkinson's Diseases life is over. (Jason D 2010, 20) They are no longer able to care for themselves. They cant walk around or enjoy life anymore. Their health begins to drop. (Jason D 2010,20) Patients become more prone to infection and disease. (Jason D 2010, 20)

There is no cure for the awful disease that is Parkinson's Disease. There may be surgeries or medication to control it but nothing can stop it. However one treatment that is used most often is called Carbidopa-Levodopa. (Stern 2013, 11)
Carbidopa- Levodopa is dopamine transfered into the brain. (Stern 2013, 12) Like any other treatment, however, there is (are) always side effects. (Stern 2013, 13) Some side effects of this treatment were bigger then others. They all varied from one end to another. One being muscle spasms. (Stern 2013, 13) Then another being irregular heart beats, nausea, hair loss, sleep disorders, confusion, anxiety, and hallucinations.( Stern 2013, 13) Even though the side effects sound bad for some these were all risks willing to be taken in order to fight for their happiness and well being. 

Parkinsons Disease takes many effects on someones brain. Not only does it take a toll on their mind but on their whole life. It effects what they can and can not do. Simple tasks someone thought they would be able to do all their life become a very difficult and frustrating  challenge. The shaking a patient suffers from never goes away. There is always movement in their body and no controlling it. Scientist work hard everyday to find cures for different terrible disease that take a big toll on people lives and their families everyday. This disease is one worth fighting for. Finding a cure would help more than thousands of people across the world who want to escape their pain and misery.
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Anonymous 2012 D

Created By: Jessica De anda
http://www.petersons.com/college-search/iowa-lakes-community-college-000_10003847.aspx

Iowa Lakes Community College

More Sharing Services
Estherville, IA
LOCATION Public
TYPE Small
SETTING
54% 46%
STUDENT RATIO
[1] 3,102
ENROLLMENT

[2] $4,320 | $4,384
IN-STATE TUITION | OUT-OF-STATE TUITION

Rolling
APPLICATION DEADLINE
[3] 92%
ACCEPTANCE RATE
Non-competitive

ADMISSION DIFFICULTY
Average test scores for all first-year students that were accepted and enrolled.Not
Reported

Majors & Degrees
Degrees Offered Bachelor's Associate's

Student Body
Gender
Total Undergraduate Students3,102
Male Student Percentage46.71%
Female Student Percentage53.29%
Ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino2.93%
Black or African American3.09%
White or Caucasian87.75%
American Indian or Alaska Native.39%
Asian1.29%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander.39%
Two or more races.39%
Unknown3.51%
Other Student Statistics
International Breakout.58% representing 6 other countries
Out-of-state StudentsNot Reported
More...
Campus Life
Housing
College-owned housing available Yes
Housing Requirements Not Reported
Housing options Coed housing , Special housing for disabled
Percentage of undergraduate students who live in college-owned housing 37%
Student Activities
Student-run campus newspaper Yes
Drama / theater group Yes
Student-run radio station Yes
Student-run television station Yes
Marching band No
Choral groups Yes
Student Services
Legal services No
Health clinic No
Personal / psychological counseling No
Women's center No
Student Organizations
Greek fraternities No
Greek sororities No
Local fraternities No
Local sororities No
Other organizations Not Reported
Most popular organizations music, Criminal Justice, nursing clubs, Environmental Studies, Business
Campus Security and Safety
24-hour emergency telephone / alarm services Yes
24-hour patrols by trained officers Not Reported
Students patrols Yes
Late-night transport / escort services Not Reported
Electronically-operated dormitory entrances Not Reported
Other Not Reported
More...
Athletics
Member of the: National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)
Men's Sports
Sport Intramural Intercollegiate Scholarship
Baseball No Division X Yes
Basketball Yes Division X Yes
Cross-country running No Division X Yes
Football Yes No No
Golf Yes Division X Yes
Racquetball Yes No No
Skiing Yes No No
Skiing (cross-country) Yes No No
Soccer Yes Division X Yes
Softball Yes No No
Swimming Yes Division X Yes
Tennis Yes No No
Tennis Yes No No
Ultimate Frisbee Yes No No
Volleyball Yes No No
Weight Lifting Yes No No
Wrestling Yes Division X Yes
Women's Sports
Sport Intramural Intercollegiate Scholarship
Baseball No No No
Basketball Yes Division X Yes
Cross-country running No Division X Yes
Football Yes No No
Golf Yes Division X Yes
Racquetball Yes No No
Skiing Yes No No
Skiing (cross-country) Yes No No
Soccer Yes Division X Yes
Softball Yes Division X Yes
Swimming Yes Division X Yes
Tennis Yes No No
Tennis Yes No No
Ultimate Frisbee Yes No No
Volleyball Yes Division X Yes
Weight Lifting Yes No No
Wrestling No No No
More...
Faculty
Faculty Breakout
[4] Total Faculty171
Full-time Percentage53.22 %
Part-time Percentage46.78 %
Female Percentage55.56 %
Male Percentage44.44 %
Student:Faculty RatioNot Reported
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Chin 2011

Created By: Jessica De anda
http://www.mae.ucla.edu/news/news-archive/2011/wind-energy-picking-up-speed

Wind Energy: Picking Up Speed
April 13, 2011

Professor Wirz, atop the giant wind turbine.

By Matthew Chin

One of the great challenges of the 21st century is converting from a high–carbon, fossil-fuel based energy economy, to one based on domestic resources that are clean and renewable.

A very promising part of meeting this challenge is using energy from the wind. Wind was first harnessed thousands of years ago when humans used it to power sailing ships. In the past generation, towering turbines along wind alleys have provided energy. But the wind energy industry is still in its infancy, holding much potential via new technologies to make it a much more efficient and more desirable part of a renewable energy portfolio.

[1] UCLA mechanical and aerospace engineering assistant professor Richard Wirz is leading several research projects on energy solutions using advanced design and modeling techniques. One major area of his research is in wind energy, a resource that may be ready for a big jump in productivity and efficiency.
“Wind has already proven itself as a viable large-scale renewable energy source, but just like airplane design over the last century, we want to continue to push our engineering knowledge and creativity to develop wind systems that are increasingly capable and economically viable,” Wirz said.

One project is a spin-off of Wirz’s work on plasma thrusters for spacecraft propulsion. Because of the variability of wind speeds, wind turbine blades don’t always have an optimal pressure gradient along their surface. The addition of small plasma actuators along the length of a blade creates an electric field that accelerates ions, and thus the local flow, along the blade’s surface. The induced flow can create a more favorable pressure gradient along the blade for improved efficiency and operation over a larger range of wind speeds.

Wirz is also conducting research on a new approach to blade design for large wind turbines that improves the aerodynamic performance and structural stability of the blades. The design could lead to larger and structurally stronger turbines. In particular, this holds promise for offshore wind energy systems. The concept is being tested both computationally and experimentally. A grant from the California Energy Commission is helping to fund modeling and wind tunnel testing of the new design.

[2] Late last year, Wirz worked out an agreement for UCLA students to have research and training time at a working wind turbine. The 1.5-megawatt turbine is operated by the North American Wind Research and Training Center (NAWRTC), which is run by Mesalands Community College in Tucumcari, New Mexico.
“The UCLA-NAWRTC relationship is exciting and unique since their turbine is specifically available for research and training the next generation of wind energy engineers and technicians,” Wirz said. “This is a wonderful opportunity for students in the UCLA research community to have hands-on experience with a state-of-the-art commercial-scale wind energy system.”


And finally, Wirz is exploring designs for small vertical axis wind turbines that are specifically designed for the urban environment and can generate energy at relatively low and unpredictable wind speeds.

More information on Wirz’ work can be found online at: http://www.wirz.seas.ucla.edu/
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Anonymous 2012 C

Created By: Jessica De anda
http://www.forbes.com/colleges/university-of-california-los-angeles/

University of California, Los Angeles
Follow (35)
At a Glance

[1] Student Population: 39,271
Undergraduate Population: 27,199
Student to Faculty Ratioa: 16:01
[2] Total Annual Costc: $54,434
In-State Tuitionc: $12,686
Out-of-State Tuitionc: $35,564
Percent on Financial Aidd: 71.0%
Design HTML Preview Words: 309   Characters: 2114        [3] Percent Admittede: 26.0%
SAT Composite Rangef: 1180
Forbes Lists

[4] #45 Overall
#22 in Research Universities
Ranked too high? Too low? Tell us what you think.
Student Body

Enrollment by Gender
Male
45%
Female
55%
Enrollment numbers from Winter 2010-Spring 2011 school year.
Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity
Asian/Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
34.0%
Black or African American
3.0%
Hispanic/Latino
17.0%
White
32.0%
Two or More Races
3.0%
Race/Ethnicity Unknown
3.0%
Non-Resident Alien
7.0%
Attendance Status
Full-Time
97.0%
Part-Time
3.0%
Sports

Athletic Divison
NCAA Division I-A
Percent of Student Body that is a Varsity Athlete
3.0%
Sports numbers from 2010-2011 Department of Education data.
Media Buzz

Facebook Friends
144701+
www.facebook.com/uclabruins
Twitter Followers

twitter.com/ucla
Campus Media
http://www.ucla.edu
http://www.youtube.com/user/UCLA
http://www.dailybruin.com
http://www.dailybruin.com/video/
Facebook & Twitter numbers calculated As of August 2012
Profile

[5] The University of California, Los Angeles is a four-year, coeducational, public research university located in Los Angeles, California. It was established in 1919. Currently, it has 27,199 undergraduate students with an additional 12,072 graduate students. On campus, an inverted fountain can be seen before it is heard because the rock-lined basin creates the sound of a flowing mountain stream. According to legend, students should only touch the water of the inverted fountain once during freshmen orientation and once after graduation, or else they will pay the consequence of not graduating in four years. With over 8 million volumes and thousands of serial subscriptions, the UCLA Library is ranked as one of the top ten academic libraries in North America. University of California, Los Angeles competes in Division I-A athletics, and the school mascot is the Nanook. The current chancellor of the university is Gene Block.
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Anonymous 2012 B

Created By: Jessica De anda
http://www.forbes.com/colleges/university-of-pennsylvania/#

University of Pennsylvania
Follow (49)
At a Glance

Student Population: 24,832
Undergraduate Population: 11,765
Student to Faculty Ratioa: 6:01
[1] Total Annual Costc: $57,360
In-State Tuitionc: $42,098
Out-of-State Tuitionc: $42,098
Percent on Financial Aidd: 63.0%
[2] Percent Admittede: 12.0%
SAT Composite Rangef: 1350
Forbes Lists

[3] #17 Overall
#16 in Private Colleges
#9 in Research Universities
Ranked too high? Too low? Tell us what you think.Student Body

Enrollment by Gender
Male
48%
Female
52%
Enrollment numbers from Winter 2010-Spring 2011 school year.
Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity
Asian/Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
17.0%
Black or African American
7.0%
Hispanic/Latino
7.0%
White
46.0%
Two or More Races
2.0%
Race/Ethnicity Unknown
9.0%
Non-Resident Alien
11.0%
Attendance Status
Full-Time
88.0%
Part-Time
12.0%
Sports

Athletic Divison
NCAA Division I-AA
Percent of Student Body that is a Varsity Athlete
9.0%
Sports numbers from 2010-2011 Department of Education data.
Media Buzz

Facebook Friends
21872+
www.facebook.com/pages/Philadelphia-PA/University-of-Pennsylvania/98508878775
Twitter Followers
7964+
twitter.com/UofPenn
Campus Media
http://www.upenn.edu
http://pennfword.com/
http://www.dailypennsylvanian.com/
http://www.utv13.org/
Facebook & Twitter numbers calculated As of August 2012

Profile
[4] The University of Pennsylvania is a four-year, coeducational, private research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was established in 1740 and its doors were opened in 1751 with the aid of Benjamin Franklin, one of the school’s – and the country’s – founding fathers. The school was the first in the colonies to offer both graduate and undergraduate programs, and opened America’s first medical school in 1765. Since 1923, over a dozen Penn scholars have won the Nobel Prize. Currently, the school has 11,765 undergraduate students with an additional 13,067 graduate students. The University of Pennsylvania competes in NCAA Division I-AA athletics and the mascot is the Quaker. In 1994, the university selected Judith Rodin to be its president, making her the first woman to helm an Ivy League university; she was succeeded in 2004 by current president Amy Gutmann.
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Anonymous 2012 A

Created By: Jessica De anda
http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/sustainability-themes/conserving-energy
Conserving Energy
Energy Management at Penn
[1]  An effective energy management and conservation strategy is an integral component of the Climate Action Plan, as decreasing or eliminating energy consumption is the most direct method of reducing the University’s carbon footprint. Over 86 percent of carbon produced by Penn is from building energy usage.

If immediate actions are not taken to reduce energy on both institutional and individual levels, Penn will nearly double its total carbon emissions by 2050. [2] To address this, Penn has established a goal to cut its campus energy use by 17 percent by 2014.

IMPLEMENTING THE CLIMATE ACTION PLAN WILL:
Develop and monitor energy conservation programs to encourage sustainable behavior among building occupants and ensure efficient management by staff
Improve and accelerate the renovation process for existing buildings
Adopt higher energy efficiency standards for new buildings and expand research of renewable energy investments
Conservation Initiatives

WIND ENERGY
[3] In 2001, Penn became a national leader in the use of renewable energy through its agreement to purchase 20 million kilowatt hours of wind-generated power per year for three years. Penn funded the premium cost of wind energy through savings from an aggressive energy-conservation program that reduced peak demand by 18 percent. In September 2002, the Federal Environmental Protection Agency and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection honored the University for its commitment to alternative energy consumption. In 2003, Penn extended its wind power purchase to a 10-year commitment, providing sustained funding that led to the construction of a new 12-turbine wind farm in Pennsylvania.


OPERATIONS COMMAND CENTER
Penn saves more than $5-million annually in energy costs through state-of the-art central monitoring and control of utilities. From its Operations Command Center, Penn engineers can control campus-wide chilled water and steam utilities, and air-handling systems in buildings across the campus. Through sophisticated temperature/time optimization, temperature setback, and demand management techniques, Penn is able to avoid costly peak utility charges and conserve energy year-round.


CHILLED WATER LOOP
Campus buildings are fed from a central chilled water loop completed in 2007 after 19 years of planned incremental growth and an investment of over $200 million. Penn's chiller plant freezes water at night when energy costs are low to provide supplemental daytime cooling capacity, reducing Penn's burden on the regional electrical grid and saving money.

Members of the Penn Community may view total electricity usage for campus overall and by building by clicking here. (PennKey required).


TC CHAN CENTER CONSULTANCIES
The University has commissioned the School of Design's TC Chan Center to provide both a building-by-building campus energy model, and a comprehensive greenhouse gas inventory. This work, carried out over the past several years, will allow the Division of Facilities and Real Estate Services to simulate efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction strategies in design, construction and energy management. The inventory provides a benchmark to measure future conservation efforts.

To see the TC Chan Center website, click here.


LIGHT BULB EXCHANGE
Each fall, the student-run Penn Environmental Group (PEG) partners with the Division of Facilities and Real Estate Services (FRES) to offer replacement compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) to students for use in their on-campus residences. In 2007, over 1000 incandescent bulbs were replaced by students in their rooms and common spaces, resulting in significant energy savings. In 2009, over 700 CFLs were handed out by members of the Sustainability Team to Penn students during the Fall move-in period.

To learn more about previous Light Bulb Exchange events, click here.

Most College Houses provide CFLs at their information desks, so be sure to check your front desk before heading out to the store.





AIRCUITY AND ZONE PRESENCE SENSORS
Over the summer of 2009, Penn Facilities and Real Estate Services (FRES), Environmental Health and Radiation Safety (EHRS), and University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) continued a 2008 energy conservation pilot that installed Aircuity’s OptiNet system to reduce excessive airflow in laboratories and vivaria, two of the campus’ biggest energy consumers.

OptiNet is an intelligent air monitoring system unlike any other system currently on the market. It operates on the concept of demand control ventilation, which determines the quantity of outside air necessary in a facility in proportion to its occupancy and air cleanliness based on a set of parameters: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), particulates, total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), temperature, and relative humidity.

The pilot, installed in one vivarium suite in Hill Pavilion and in one lab suite in the Lynch Life Sciences Building for just over a year, already is producing significant energy savings in both buildings. Since the installation of the pilot Aircuity systems, significant energy savings have been realized with no deterioration in indoor air quality; the estimated payback period is less than two years. The pilot program is now being expanded to other vivaria as well as to the Translational Research Center, now under construction.


GREEN IT
Organizations throughout Penn are examining their computing practices in an effort to conserve energy. From using software solutions to automatically power down computers to conducting local awareness campaigns to remind users to shut down devices when they are not in use, Penn IT staff are working together with the rest of the Penn community to use less electricity. For more information and best practices related to powering down computing devices, visit the Green IT web site.


COMPUTER CONNECTION
The Computer Connection, located at the back of the Penn Bookstore, has items that can save both money and energy, including solar-powered battery chargers, energy-saving surge strips and duplex laser printers. In addition to being energy efficient, items such the Simple Tech hard drive are made with renewable, naturally grown bamboo and recyclable aluminum. To learn more, visit the Computer Connection website.



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Themes
Learning Sustainability
Conserving Energy
Designing Green
Minimizing Waste
Reducing Emissions
Purchasing Practices
Local Foods
Fact

Over sixty Penn staff members have received education in LEED 2009 standards.

RELATED LINKS
The Penn Climate Action Plan
Sign Up for the Green Campus Partnership e-Newsletter
Penn-Tsinghua TC Chan Center
Light Bulb Exchange
Harnwell Building Dashboard
Calculate Your Personal Carbon Footprint
Penn Facilities and Real Estate Services


© 2012 University of Pennsylvania | 3101 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 | sustainability@upenn.edu
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