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EcoColumn Week 2

Created By: Jessica Stewart
Ecocolumn Weekly Data Log
 February 8, 2013

Date of observation: 2/8/13

Date of previous observation: 1/29/13

Qualitative Data:
descriptions of what you see:
soil chamber: Thyme leaves sprouting; some mold; possible reactions from being in a green bottle

compost chamber: still some visible mold; leaves still not decomposed

aquatic chamber: water is clear; bubbles on leaves and stem

images of your system (upload to MyFiles; Images: or Videos before inserting into this document):
soil chamber:



compost chamber:



aquatic water chamber:



Quantitative Data
soil chamber
temperature: 22.4 degrees celsius
% moisture: 8%

compost chamber
temperature: 21.7 degrees celsius

% moisture:  -5%

water water chamber
temperature: 22 degrees celsius
pH: 8.1
dissolved Oxygen (DO) mg/L or ppm: 6.1
Ammonia ion concentration mg/L or ppm: .2
Nitrate ion concentration mg/L or ppm: 9.5
Chloride Ion concentration mg/L or ppm: 83
Any other requested quantitative test results:

How accurate was (were) your prediction(s) from last week?

Our predictions were off because we expected our DO to increase, but it did not.

Describe how far off you were and hypothesize why.

We expected our DO to be at least up by two points (8.0), but it remained the same as last week. (6.1)

What observations were of the greatest interest or concern to you this week?

Our dissolved oxygen content in the chamber with the animal.

What adjustments did you make to address your concerns?

We added our animal to the water chamber.

What do you predict you will observe next week because of these adjustments?

Possibly an increased dissolved oxygen, at least two points, and a change in the clarity of the water.

Any real world application to what you saw this week?
We observed how the addition of animals change the ecosystem and how the growth of plants also affect the ecosystem.

A

B

C

D

Test

Results

Unit

Q-Value

Weighting Factor

Subtotal

Temperature

     21.7 

Celsius

.11

pH

8.1

pH unit

.11

Turbidity

 

NTU

.08

Total Solids

mg/l

.07

Dissolved Oxygen

 5.8

%sat.

.17

Nitrates

 7.3

mg/l NO3-N

.10

Fecal Coliform

CFU/100 mL

.16

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EcoColumn Weekly Data Log

Created By: Jessica Stewart
EcoColumn Weekly Data Log

Date of observation
: 1-29-13

Date of previous observation: None

Qualitative Data:
descriptions of what you see:
soil chamber: Moist, damp soil with no worms visible

compost chamber: Damp, moist with mold developing

aquatic chamber: Plant has air bubbles along its leaves and stem

images of your system (upload to MyFiles; Images: or Videos before inserting into this document):
soil chamber:



compost chamber:



aquatic water chamber:


Quantitative Data
soil chamber
temperature: 23 degrees celsius

% moisture: 8%

compost chamber
temperature: 22.2 degrees celsius
pH: 7.1
% moisture:  -5%

water water chamber
temperature:20.8 degrees celsius
pH: 6.7
dissolved Oxygen (DO) mg/L or ppm: 5.8
Ammonia ion concentration mg/L or ppm: .1 mg/l
Nitrate ion concentration mg/L or ppm: 7.3

Chloride Ion concentration mg/L or ppm: 83.2

Any other requested quantitative test results:

How accurate was (were) your prediction(s) from last week?

N/A

Describe how far off you were and hypothesize why.

N/A

What observations were of the greatest interest or concern to you this week?

We need our dissolved oxygen content to increase in order to feel confident in putting our animal into the ecosystem.

What adjustments did you make to address your concerns?

We are going to wait until the DO content increases before we add our animal.

What do you predict you will observe next week because of these adjustments?

Hopefully an increased dissolved oxygen content so we can add an animal.

Any real world application to what you saw this week?
We saw how the amount of different chemicals and minerals in the water affects the well being of the animals.

WQI Data Table

 

 A

 

 B

 C

 D

 Test

 Results

 Unit

 Q-Value

 Weighting Factor

 Subtotal

Temperature 

23.2 

 Celsius

 

 .11

 

pH 

9.5 

pH unit 

 

 .11

 

 Turbidity

 54

 NTU

 

 .08

 

Total Solids 

 

 mg/l

 

 .07

 

 Dissolved Oxygen

 7.5

 %sat.

 

.17 

 

 Nitrates

 19.3

 mg/l NO3-N

 

.10 

 

 Fecal Coliform

 

 CFU/100 mL

 

 .16

 


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1/23

Created By: Jessica Stewart
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Ellis 2009

Created By: Jessica Stewart

http://www.qualityhealth.com/allergies-articles/allergies-cancer-connection

[1]If you suffer from severe allergies, you may find it hard to understand how your discomfort could actually turn out to be a real blessing.  But some researchers believe that the sneezing, itchy eyes, nose and throat and tiredness that go along with different types of hay fever and allergic reactions could actually be protective.

Allergies and Cancer

[2]Though the correlation seems unbelievable, several studies have discovered that having allergies may lower your risk of getting certain types of cancers. So the misery you suffer might really be the lesser of two evils.

The jury is still out as to exactly how allergies and cancer interrelate, but there are several different theories as to why having allergies seems to lower the risk of getting a cancer diagnosis.

The Theories that Exist

[3]Both allergies and cancer affect the immune system, but doctors suggest that the way they do this can differ a great deal and this programming may be at the heart of deciding which condition you will get. In allergies, the immune system has a heightened response to various triggers, while in cancer, the problem could stem from an immunodeficiency instead. Therefore, one thought is that most people whose immune response is hyper reactive may be less likely to be programmed to develop cancer.

Another possible theory to try to explain exactly why some types of allergies can protect you against some types of cancers is that when your immune system is programmed to fight off cancer cells, the actual process may also cause the hyper responsive state that triggers the allergic reactions you experience.

Regardless of why and how it occurs, though, recognizing the relationship between allergies and cancer that exists could actually make your seasonal symptoms seem much easier to bear this year.

The Findings on Allergies and Cancer

[4]It is not only nasal allergies that seem to lower the risk of developing cancer. A study looking at eczema (also called atopic dermatitis) found that this skin reaction decreased the risk of being diagnoses with several types of cancers, including pancreatic cancer, brain cancer and childhood leukemia.

Another study, this one looking at the risk of getting non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, found that atopic dermatitis didn't offer protection against this specific disease, but having hay fever and food allergies did greatly reduce the odds of getting it.

Unexpected Results

[5]It is also interesting to note that some researchers say that the protective factor that allergies bring actually contradicts their expectations in how allergies and cancer are related. In fact, some experts admit that would have thought the immune system reaction that occurs with allergies would be more likely to increase the susceptibility to developing cancer cells as well. But in a surprising twist, just the opposite seems to be true. This finding is certainly good news for you.

So  next time your allergies make you sneeze, just keep in mind that it may not actually end up being such a bad thing.

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Fayed 2009

Created By: Jessica Stewart
http://cancer.about.com/od/newlydiagnosed/a/whatcancer.htm

How Does Cancer Develop?
The organs in our body are made up of cells. Cells divide and multiply as the body needs them. [1]When these cells continue multiplying when the body doesn't need them, the result is a mass or growth, also called a tumor.

These growths are considered either benign or malignant. Benign is considered non-cancerous and malignant is cancerous. Benign tumors rarely are life threatening and do not spread to other parts of the body. They can often be removed.
Malignant tumors, however, often invade nearby tissue and organs, spreading the disease.




How Does Cancer Spread to Other Parts of the Body?
[2]The cells within malignant tumors have the ability to invade neighboring tissues and organs, thus spreading the disease. It is also possible for cancerous cells to break free from the tumor site and enter the bloodstream, spreading the disease to other organs. This process of spreading is called metastasis.

When cancer has metastasized and has affected other areas of the body, the disease is still referred to the organ of origination. For example, if cervical cancer spreads to the lungs, it is still called cervical cancer, not lung cancer.

[3]Although most cancers develop and spread this way -- via an organ - blood cancer like leukemia do not. They affect the blood and the organs that form blood and then invade nearby tissues.
Cancer Symptoms
Symptoms of cancer vary based on the type of cancer. As cancer progresses to an advanced stage, common symptoms can include weight loss, fever, and fatigue. These are very non-specific symptoms that are more likely related to other less serious illnesses than cancer.
[4]Cancer Symptoms
Symptoms of cancer vary based on the type of cancer. As cancer progresses to an advanced stage, common symptoms can include weight loss, fever, and fatigue. These are very non-specific symptoms that are more likely related to other less serious illnesses than cancer.

Treatment of Cancer
[5]There are four standard methods of treatment for cancer: surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and immunotherapy/biologic therapy. When initially diagnosed with cancer, a cancer specialist (called an oncologist) will provide the patient with cancer treatment options. He or she will recommend the best treatment plan based on the type of cancer, how far it has spread, and other important factors like age and general health.

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Anonymous 2010

Created By: Jessica Stewart
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&defl=en&q=define:cancer&sa=X&ei=ntScTevFGYi-sAPuoKyABA&ved=0CDAQkAE

Define: Cancer
[1]any malignant growth or tumor caused by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division; it may spread to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or the blood stream
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